Martinez Tools M1 Titanium Framing Hammer

Ease of Use
Durability
Effectiveness
Expense
Summary
Ok folks up until recently the best titanium hammers on the market were the Stiletto tools that we all know and love. Something I hadn't realized up until now was that the first titanium was invented and patented by a Stiletto employee at the time, Mark Martinez. Well folks, Mark has since left Stiletto and started his own company known as Martinez Tools. These are hammers done his way, the way they are supposed to be. Let me say right now folks that this is top quality product. One user stated, "It is like having the comfort and function of a stiletto hammer with the durability of an Estwing." The only warning I will give you on this product is get ready to pay a heft price tag as this is top grade material and workmanship all made right here in the United States. If you are a contractor or even a carpentry enthusiast then I would highly recommend purchasing this product.
4.4

Buy Now!

Alright boys and girls gather around and I shall tell you about the most tough ass hammer you can possibly imagine. Yes, that’s right I’m talking about a titanium hammer, but this isn’t just any titanium hammer this is a titanium hammer made by the one and only Mark Martinez.  Who’s Mark you may ask? Well he is the original inventor, patenter, and designer of the original titanium hammer from Stiletto Tools. Mark has since left Stiletto Tools and formed his own company known as Martinez Tool. This is great for the contractors out there. With this new company Mark gets to do hammers the way he wants to do them. They are American Made. They have a titanium handle. They have a steel head. They are a beast! The Martinez Tool’s official website can be found by clicking here.

Martinez Tools M1 Titanium Handle 15oz Smooth Steel Head Curved Grip Framing Hammer

The Pros

I hate writing reviews where it seems like I’m gushing over a product so I’ll warn you guys right now. The M1 titanium hammer is the best of both worlds. You get the titanium handle that extends to sixteen inches complimented with a steel head. This is a key difference when comparing it to other titanium hammers. Most of them will have a solid one piece titanium construction or they’ll have a titanium head and a wooden handle. This M1 hammer is the first that I have seen that has a titanium handle and a steel head.  There are three huge benefits to this design:

  1. The titanium hammer absorbs shock like you wouldn’t believe. Everyone is always amazed the first time they go from swiniging a steel hammer to a titanium hammer. Sure, those young guys can handle the heavy steel hammers but over time their body will begin to wear out and betray them. Their wrist will get sore, their elbow, their shoulder. It’s not a pretty picture. This titanium handle prevents all of that by reducing the shock and recoil by ten times when compared to a steel hammer. Your body will thank you if you purchase this hammer!
  2. The second big point here to make is that the steel head gives you that extra power when driving the big nails. It also gives you the top heavy feel that so many carpenters love. This hammer won’t take ‘getting used to,’ like some of the other competing hammers on the market.
  3. Lastly, don’t let the fifteen ounce size of the hammer scare you away. Titanium is forty-five percent lighter than steel. So, that means that you are getting the same power as a twenty-four ounce steel framing hammer with each swing. Fifteen ounce isn’t a ‘weak’ hammer by any means when it comes with a titanium handle and a steel head.

This M1 hammer comes with a replaceable face option that will allow you to change from a smooth or waffle face as you need. Or, if your waffle face is wearing out then all you have to do is buy a replacement face, take off the old one, and pop on the new one. It’s that simple. Moving down the head of the hammer we also have a side nail puller that a lot of the pros love to use. As with most framing hammers you have your rip claw for demolition as well.

This feature really caught my attention. This is the replaceable grip that goes along the handle. What other hammer has this option? Most of the time if your grip wears out you either have to send it in to the manufacturer to get replaced or you have to buy a whole new hammer. Not with Martinez Tools. No sir. You can replace the grip all by yourself. In fact, if you click here you can see their official video on how to replace the grip.

I looked around on their site for a written warranty policy but couldn’t find anything official. Instead I did find this excerpt on their site, “All Martinez Tool Co. hammers are 100% guaranteed for workmanship and defects.” From what I have researched though if you have a problem with one of their hammers they will go above and beyond to ensure that you are satisfied and taken care of.

The last big pro here is that this hammer is all American Made. It pains me that this is seen as a pro nowadays as it seems like everything is made overseas now. Not Martinez. No, they are making everything here in the states and ensuring that top quality goes into their hammers.

The Cons

Honestly the only con or downside to this hammer that I could find after scouring the internet was how expensive it is. Most hammers are between fifteen dollars upwards to fifty for a decent one. Keep in mind that prices change rather constantly but today as I write this the Martinez M1 is going for just two-hundred and twenty-four dollars. Yes, I know that is a lot of money just for a hammer. The thing to remember though is this a hammer that is going to last forever. This is the kind of hammer that can be passed down on and on for generations to come. There is no wooden handle to rot away. The titanium will be there and be with you always hanging in your garage waiting for you to use it.

The other point to make on this hammer that could potentially make it a Con is theft. I have seen it so many times. You leave your tools and step away for a few minutes. Maybe you’re taking a piss. I don’t know. But there is an opportunity and when you come back you’ll find that your prized hammer has walked off never to be seen again. Be sure that you keep this thing locked down and in your sight especially if you’re going to be working at a busy job sight. Heck, I’ve even read some accounts of owners not even wanting others to even hold their Martinez hammer. It’s just too valuable to lose. It’s not worth the risk!

Conclusion

While this is a titanium hammer and is top quality off the bat, to me it’s all the little things and upgrades that we see with this hammer that really sell it for me. The side nail puller. The replaceable grip. Swapping our smooth or waffle face. All of this done with ease. You just don’t see these kind of features on other hammers out there, even the titanium ones. Many many users are already ranking this new Martinez hammer much higher then the Stiletto models that have been out there for years. Mark should take it as a compliment, after all they are both his hammer designs!

I’m going to tell you guys right now if you are a contractor, a carpentry enthusiast, or just someone who is swinging a hammer all day long then you NEED to get this M1 Martinez hammer now. Your body will thank you. Sure, it’s a hit to your pocket book but I can assure you that you will not need to replace this hammer. If you are looking to purchase please click here to visit our Amazon.com partner.

Thanks for reading,

Alec John Johnson

ToughAssTools.com

A hammer is a hammer, right? Wrong folks. There are so many different types of hammers on the market today and each one has their own specific purpose. It can be overwhelming to a novice and once you’ve finally decided on the type of hammer you want there are dozens of variations of size, material, claws, and other features to choose from. Will you choose what’s right for you? Or, will you end up with the wrong type of hammer, that is unbalanced, and a broken handle after only a few weeks of use?

Well ladies and gentlemen I aim to answer those questions and more for you. Today on ToughAssTools.com we’re going to be taking an in-depth look at framing hammers. What are framing hammers? What  type hammer should you get? What size? This buyer’s guide will go through exactly what to look for and exactly what the right fit is for you.

Why Use a Framing Hammer?

Well, just as the name says a framing hammer is used for just that, framing. What does that mean exactly? Well, the intention of this hammer is to be used when putting up the foundation of whatever you are building. Think of it like the guts of you house. The two-by-fours and four-by-sixes holding your house, garage, or barn together. This is where a framing hammer is used.

You wouldn’t use a framing hammer to finish a product but you would use it to drive a bunch of 12D three and a quarter inch nails on the frame of a new garage. In most cases you will see experienced carpenters carry at least a couple of hammers with them and one of them will always be a framing hammer. They use their best judgement on what hammer to use on each situation. For example, you wouldn’t use a framing hammer to nail in the new trim that you are installing in your living room. The force of the blow may cause the thin trim board to splinter not to mention the damage a waffle face could have on your trim.

What Are Framing Hammers?

First thing’s first. It’s good to understand exactly what framing hammers are. What sets them apart? Truth be told there aren’t that many differences between a framing hammer and your standard hammer that you would find hanging on the rack in your hardware store. Those in the industry call those standard hammers the Homeowner’s hammers. (That’s not a compliment.) The distinction between a framing hammer and a standard hammer can be laid out in three points:

  1. The first noticeable difference on a framing hammer is that they are significantly heavier than a standard hammer. A standard hammer will come in between twelve to fourteen ounces. A framing hammer usually starts at twenty ounces and can go all the way up to thirty-two ounces. This large size difference is meant for power. You need to have that extra weight when it comes to driving those three and a half inch long 16D nails.
  2. I can almost guarantee that most of you have used your standard hammer at some point in time. When you used that hammer you probably noticed that the face of the hammer (The part that does the hammering.) was smooth. This smooth faced hammer is again tied to your standard hammer. Framing hammers typically come with an edged, or waffle, face. If you look at the picture to the right you can see why it is called a waffle face. The point of this serrated face is for grip. The indentations on the face help grip the nail during drives and prevents the nail from slipping and rolling away from you. Estwing E3-22SM 22 oz Framing Hammer with Milled Face & Shock Reduction Grip
  3. The last feature that separates the framing hammer from the standard is the length of the handle. Your standard hammers will come with a thirteen to fourteen inch handle. A framing hammer will come with a sixteen all the way up to eighteen inch handle. The reason for this is to add more leverage and power with each swing that you do. Now there are some framers out there that have a thirteen inch handle but most of the time you’re going to see this longer handle on a framer.

Alright, so now when you go to the store or look on Amazon.com you can tell the difference between a standard hammer and a framing hammer. But now what? What size framer should you get? What kind of handle? What kind of head? Well there are a few considerations to keep in mind before purchasing your new framing hammer.

Considerations

  1. The first consideration when looking at a new framing hammer is the type of handle on your hammer. There are three main types of handles that you will run into: Wood, Fiberglass, and Steel. There are significant pros and cons between each one. Let’s take a look:
    1. The wooden handles are great for shock absorption and ease of use. However, the downside to wooden handles are there tendency to break or snap in half over extended use. The snap could happen during a drive or when trying to pull a nail out with your claw. If you don’t mind replacing the wooden handles and enjoy the lessened shock from a steel handle than this is your choice.
    2. Steel hammers are almost the exact opposite of their wooden counterpart. With a steel hammer you get a huge boost to durability. A steel handle isn’t going to break or snap on you. You don’t have to worry about applying too much pressure on the handle when ripping out a nail. However, unlike the wooden you will find that steel handles are notoriously bad for shock. The steel reverberates and vibrate with each drive you that hit. These vibrations work their way up to your wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Some steel handles come with a rubber or poly grip to help with the shock but a wooden handle will always be better. If you’re a young guy and don’t mind the shock now or if you are just a do-it-yourselfer then I would recommend steel. If you are a full time carpenter and will be using this hammer day in and day out then I would lean you towards the wood to help save your arm.
    3. The last type worth mentioning is the fiberglass. The fiberglass handle is a medium between the steel and wood. Fiberglass is tougher and has increased durability then wood but it is not unbreakable. It may eventually break on you but it will definitely last longer than a wooden. The shock on a fiberglass handle is right in the middle as well between steel and wood. If you are looking for a mixture of both durability and shock dampening then a fiberglass hammer handle may be for you.
    4. The last thing worth mentioning on handles is the size or length of the handle. Are you comfortable swinging a standard thirteen inch or do you think you can handle an extended handle up to seventeen or even eighteen inches? If you opt for the longer handle it may take some time to get used to it but I can assure you that will enjoy the increased power with each drive.
  2. The next thing to consider when buying a framing hammer is weight or size of the hammer. There are so many sizes to choose from on hammers that it can be overwhelming. They can go from eight to ten ounces all the way up to a monster thirty-two ouncer. There are two pieces of advice I can give on this aspect of your product. The first is to physically hold the hammer and practice, or actually do a couple, swings. How does it feel in your hands? Could you stand repeating that motion dozens of times a day? Or, is it too heavy? The other piece of advice I can give on this is that if you are looking for a framing hammer then I would suggest going with a standard twenty-ouncer or a twenty-two ouncer. These are a safe size that will allow you to get enough power without having to get a giant hammer and risk hurting yourself or the project.
  3. Shock and user fatigue are one of the most important things to consider when looking at a hammer. The reason is right there as well. If you don’t know by now then you should know that you need to protect and take care of your body. We aren’t invincible. We won’t always be twenty years old. If you choose the wrong hammer and end up using it day in and day out you are going to run into injuries. It’s just a matter of time. You may develop Carpel Tunnel. You may develop Tennis Elbow. Or, you may end up messing your shoulder up. Either way you’ll end up paying for it. That is why today I say stay away from the gigantic sized framing hammers like the twenty-eight, thirty, or thirty-two ouncers. They aren’t worth the price you pay not to mention how fast you will fatigue swinging that large of a hammer. On top of that if you are still concerned about the shock and the effects it will have then I would suggest getting a wooden handle framer or a steel product with a proven shock absorption handle such as Estwing’s framer.
  4. Most framing hammers will come with a waffle or edged face by default. Carpenters and tradesmen like the waffle face as it makes easier to grip the nails and prevents slippage when driving. Now there are some framing hammer choices out there that come with a smooth face but they are not nearly as popular. Honestly, this doesn’t make that much of a difference but if you’re really wanting that smooth face then it may take a bit to find it but they are out there. Click here for an example of a smooth faced framing hammer. Either way the price will remain right about the same for a waffle or a smooth face.
  5. The last consideration is the price. Prices on framing hammers can vary wildly. Some are as low as fifteen to twenty dollars and some are as high as over two-hundred dollars… some even more. All of this price range depends on one word. Quality. Do you want a hammer that will last you for a year or two, or do you want a hammer that will last generations and that you can pass on down to your son and maybe even his son? It all depends on how much you are willing to spend. For example, Stiletto offers a premium solid Titanium framing hammer for around two-hundred dollars on Amazon.com. (Prices subject to change.) This hammer will last forever. Or, you could spend fifteen and get a standard framing hammer. It’s up to you.

Alright folks so you are ready to buy and you know what you are looking for. Let’s take a look at some of our preferred picks here on ToughAssTools.com:

ToughAssTool’s Preferred Picks

What I like to do when looking at something to buy, especially a tool, is to take the Good, Better, Best approach. What is this you may ask? Well, in my opinion there are three types of consumers in this world. The first being the ones who only want to pay the bare minimum, the second is the middle of the road guy who can afford to spend a little bit more, and the third being the premium money is no object kind of guy. We all wish we could be that last guy but the truth is most of fall into the either the second or first category.

Now with the Good, Better, Best approach I do not like to recommend junk. Hence the name Good. I will recommend a good product that will last for some time but if you want a nicer product than we can move up to the better and if you want the premium then we move up to the best. In this article I am going to choose a framing hammer based off the model I discussed above. The question is what kind of consumer are you? (I’m ashamed to admit that I’m the bare minimum guy!)

Good

Stanley 51-402 FatMax 22-Ounce

Stanley 51-402 FatMax 22-Ounce Checkered Face Framing Hammer

Buy Now!

Alright folks. So you want yourself a framing hammer but are a little intimidated by the price? Well, I’ve got just the one for you. Let’s take a look at the Stanley 51-402 FatMax Framing Hammer. Now, like most tools that you buy nowadays this hammer is imported. I am not sure from what country but it seems that imports are the norm these days. Don’t let that scare you though. Even though this product was imported from overseas it doesn’t mean that it is not a quality hammer.

Remember how I had mentioned earlier that most framing hammers were of a one piece construction? Well, unfortunately, this one is not. The handle of this hammer is made out of Hickory. The manufacturer states that the head and the handle were ‘forged and heat treated’ for increased durability but there is still that risk of the head coming flying off after years of use. But, that is the price that you pay for getting the Good and not the Better or Best.

This hammer comes in at twenty-two ounces. This is your right around your standard size for a framing hammer and as we discussed above this extra weight will give you additional force when driving those larger nails in. Also like before the head of this hammer is checkered or edged to allow better gripping when driving your nails in and to make things even easier the head is magnetized to ensure that your nails are not getting away.

The specifications on this hammer are as follows:

  • Claw Style – Rip
  • Face Style – Checkered
  • Handle Type – Axe
  • Head Length – 6-1/8
  • Overall Length – 18-1/4

This product is made by the StanleyTools company and comes with a limited lifetime warranty. As with most warranties there is a slew of fine print which can be read from StanleyTools’ website by clicking here. Basically, their warranty states that as long as you are not using the hammer in ways that you shouldn’t than they will replace your product if it is defective. So, if you get it in the mail and the head is already jostling around then you can visit their website through the link I provided above and get yourself a new replacement product.

Overall, this hammer has great reviews across the web. Looking at Amazon.com on this product we can see that there are nearly two-hundred and fifty reviews on file. The average rating is 4.5/5.0. That’s a ninety percent approval rating, it is hard to get better than that. The only downsides of this product that I have seen are that, like I said before, the head separating from the handle or that the head was not fitted tightly. But even if you do have problems with the hammer staying together you have their lifetime warranty to refer to. There have been a few grumblings of the magnetic head not working well or not working at all but these complaints have been very minimal and I do not believe that they are a legitimate problem.

If you are in the market for a framing hammer but looking to save some money than this is the product for you. However, if you are looking for a better product than by all means keep on reading my friend.

Better

Estwing E3-22S 22 Ounce

Buy Now!

Now we’re getting there folks. We’re not quite at Tough-Ass quality yet but we are getting closer. If you are one of those middle of the road guys than the Estwing E3-22S Framing Hammer is the one for you. Remember how I was talking about most framing hammers being of one piece construction? Well this guy is it. The Estwing E3 is a one piece solid steel construction. This thing is not going to break no matter what you do to it. If there is one purpose to my site than this it. I want to suggest tools that are going sit on your shelf for decades. Durability is key here.

Another important note to mention on this hammer is that it is manufactured by the Estwing company. What does that mean? Well my friends the Estwing company is an American company that has been around since 1923. They are located in Rockford, Illinois and still manufacture hammers there today. No imports here. This the real deal, American made. Their official website can be found by clicking here. Nylon Grip on Estwing Hamme

While this is a one piece hammer of solid steel it wouldn’t make sense to have the handle without a cover. I can’t imagine trying to swing a steel handled hammer. It just wouldn’t be comfortable not to mention the shock you would feel in your arms. So, what Estwing did was create a Nylon based handle and molded it right onto the steel base. This Nylon handle is unique to the Estwing company. Along with being durable the cover has a shock absorption system that minimizes the pressure of impacts with each swing. So, even though you are swinging a heavier hammer you will actually feel less impact. Lastly, the Nylon grips with your hand and makes it easier to hold on during swings even when your hands are sweating like crazy during a shingle job. A picture of the Nylon grip is below:

Like most framing hammers this one comes in at twenty-two ounces. One thing to mention is that unlike the first hammer we looked at there is NOT a magnetic head on this Estwing hammer. The head on this hammer is not checkered or serrated either. So, while you may have the one piece construction you are lacking the benefits of the edged head and the magnets. So, it’s really up to you what you think is more important.

If you buy this hammer it will come in looking brand new. The lacquer on the outside of the steel will shine and shimmer in the sunlight. No seriously, it will actually shimmer in the sunlight. The hammer has a polished silver look to it. I mention this because the only negative thing I can find on this hammer is that after seeing repeated use the silver lacquer on the outside of the hammer begins to chip and peel away. While this may look like the hammer is falling apart on you it is really not. This is jut the lacquer coming off. The actual steel construction is still there and as solid as ever. An example picture of the lacquer chipping away can be seen below.

For about the double the price of the first hammer that I recommended you get this one of a kind Estwing solid steel framing hammer. When comparing the two hammers the Estwing definitely comes out on top even without the edged head or magnets. The question you have to ask yourself is it worth paying more money. In my opinion I would say it is as this hammer will NOT break on you. If you are interested in purchasing then please click here to go to Amazon.com. However, if you are one of those best of the best guys than I would recommend you check out the next hammer in this article.

Best

Stiletto TB15MC TiBone

Stiletto TB15MC TiBone 15-Ounce Titanium Milled-Face Hammer

Buy Now!

No article on this website is complete without the mention of a Tough-Ass Tool and this hammer is a prime example. The Stiletto TB15MC TiBone hammer is the best of the best. You cannot find a better hammer in my opinion. This baby is made of titanium. Yes, you heard right freaking titanium. While this is only a fifteen ounce hammer the manufacturer, and many other customers, state that it drives like a twenty-eight ounce one.

The difference here is titanium is much lighter than steel, forty percent lighter. What does that mean? It means that this hammer is much lighter than the steel hammer that we looked at earlier but has the same driving power. You and your body get the benefit of swinging a much lighter hammer and you still get the raw power of a monster steel framer. This is done through better and more efficient transfer of power. As they always say work smarter, not harder.

Remember that nylon grip that I was talking about on the steel Estwing? You know, the one that reduced shock when driving nails in? Well, the Stiletto doesn’t have a nylon grip… it doesn’t need one. The titanium make of this hammer automatically reduces recoil and impact by over ten times when comparing it to steel. A reviewer from Amazon even stated that, “A little expensive but worth it, especially if your dealing with carpal tunnel like I am.” There is a still a cover on this handle but it is made of standard rubber that grips to your hand.

The handle has an axe style grip to it that slightly curves which makes driving that much easier. Just like the first hammer that we reviewed the Stiletto has a magnetized head along with a milled or edged face. To top it off this edged face is replaceable. So, after years of use you find that the edging has chipped or smoothed away all you have to do is buy a replacement from Stiletto’s website. (The link is here to their company website.)

Other hammers come with a lifetime warranty. Now, I’m not sure how big of a deal this really is. I mean who is going to keep their paperwork for decades down the road until your tool eventually breaks? I’m not that organized. The Stiletto comes with a one year warranty that ensures the hammer is free of any defects or manufacturing errors. If you receive your hammer and find that it is damaged then all you have to do is visit Stiletto’s website and view their return policy. The link to their return section can be found by clicking here.

Another thing worth mentioning on this hammer is the nail side puller. Stiletto claims that they have a new patented puller that will ease out 16D nails out with one one-hundred and eighty degree motion. I was a little skeptical so I checked some of the reviews looking for any mention of the nail puller. One buyer stated that, “I can’t say enough good things about the side nail puller!”  

There are only two downsides to this hammer that I can find. The first is obvious, and that is the price. This is not a cheap hammer. But, as I stated above we are in the Best category right now. I am going to recommend the best framing hammer out there that I can find and this ladies and gentlemen is it. I mean just look at how they ship their product. (Picture below.) I’m sure if you bought some cheapo hammer on Amazon it would not come to you like that.

Stiletto TB15MC TiBone Packaging

The second downside to this hammer is the length of the handle. Now, some people may see this as a benefit but others complain about it. Honestly, from what I can see and from what I have read it has the typical standard length of any framing hammer. The handle comes in at a length of 17 1/2 inches. Guys who are used to a sixteen inch handle may need to take some time to get used to it, but it is worth it. Yes it is long but as I have said earlier the longer the handle the more force you are going to have. It may very well be that the reason it can drive like a twenty-eight ounce hammer is due to the length of the handle.

When looking on online there are nothing but positive reviews. I struggled to find anything negative about this thing. If we look on Amazon.com we can see that this hammer over one-hundred reviews and almost all of them at four or five stars. (Overall rating of 4.5/5.0) If you are looking for a Tough-Ass Tool than this my friends is it. I highly HIGHLY recommend getting this and adding it to your tool belt.

Conclusion

Well folks that about sums it up. We have taken a look at everything there is to know about a framing hammer ranging from the handle to what face to choose from. Along with that we also provided our top choices on the market today and why they are worth your time to review. The question for you now is have you decided what framing hammer is best for you? If not, what is holding you back? Did we miss something? Do you still have questions unanswered? Then by all means please contact us by clicking this link and let us know!

Thanks for reading and I hope that I was able to help in your buying choice today.

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

American Made Estwings

Stiletto Tool company is one of the best, if not the best, manufacturer of premium hammers around. They have been around for over one-hundred and fifty years. They were first started all the way back in 1849 when the California Gold Rush began. Ever since then they have been making premium tools that are used around the world and are found at most job sites. Stiletto TB15MC TiBone 15-Ounce Titanium Milled-Face Hammer

In 1998 Mark Martinez of Stiletto Tool patented the first ever Titanium hammer. This hammer was one of a kind. Mark’s goal was to create a hammer that was simpler to use and that would be much easier on the user’s wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Anyone who has swung a steel hammer all day will know what I am talking about. The veterans out there who have been swinging steel for decades know the consequences. Carpel Tunnel, Tennis Elbow, and more. It will take a toll on your body.

So why Titanium? Well Titanium is forty percent lighter than steel but hits with the same amount of force that a larger steel framing hammer would. That’s why you can get a sixteen ounce Ti hammer and have it hit like a twenty-sixer or even a twenty-eight ouncer. Along with the lower weight Titanium also has ten times less the shock than a standard steel. What that means if that the user gets an overall lighter hammer and one that has significantly less shock. Trust me, your body will thank you once you start swinging Titanium.

In 1999 Stiletto Tool launched their first Titanium hammer for production. As they say, the rest is history. Ever since then Titanium hammers have been increasing in popularity across the country. As the years and decades have passed new competitors have even come into the market recognizing the potential for Titanium hammers.

Made in America or Made in China?

When I was researching Stiletto products there was a lot of back and forth between users and reviewers stating that Stiletto hammers were made in the US. No, they were made in China. No, they used to be made in US but now in China. I could go on and on. It seemed like no only really knew for sure where these products were being made and no clear answers were to be found. I hate having inconsistent data and facts so I reached out to Stiletto Tool and asked them myself. Just where are there hammers manufactured nowadays in 2017? Well folks they got back to me in only a few days. Let’s take a look at the results.

The Verdict

Joel Allen of Stiletto Tool reached out to me this afternoon with a response. The short answer here is that the solid Stiletto Titanium hammers like the TBM14RMC TiBone Mini-14 ounce and the TB15Mc TiBone 15 ounce are made right here in the United States. These hammers are your best of the best with a solid Titanium head and handle. These things won’t break on you no matter what you do! Just be warned that the price tag on these babies are quite high and may end up running at or above two-hundred dollars. (Prices subject to change at any time.) I can assure you though that if you are a full time carpenter or tradesmen than these things are worth the hefty price tag.

Stiletto TB15MC TiBone 15-Ounce Titanium Milled-Face Hammer (Tools & Home Improvement)


Titanium head has a replaceable steel face, magnetic nail starter and side nail puller which eases 16s nails out with one 180 degree motion. Hammer handle is cast titanium with an ergonomically contoured hard wearing black rubber grip.
List Price: $215.00 USD
New From: $199.00 USD In Stock
Used from: $250.00 USD In Stock

Stiletto also linked me to a video that is on YouTube showing their manufacturing process on these types of hammers. It’s an interesting watch and shows you the amount of effort and care they put into the manufacturing process of each of their hammers. If you weren’t sold on their quality before you will be after watching that video. Click here for the video. Joel also mentioned:

“The Titanium bodies for these models are cast in Los Angeles, and then shipped to Texas, where the grips are injection over-molded onto the castings, the replaceable faces are installed, and the completed hammers are packaged.” – Joel Allen – Stiletto Tool

Now those of you who are wood handle, or fiberglass handle, fans may be asking yourself why I haven’t mentioned those yet. Well, the second part of this story is that these types of hammers from Stiletto with the Titanium head but with a wooden or fiberglass handle are sadly not made in the United States. They are manufactured in China but Joel from Stiletto assured me that the very same quality that we saw in the video above is carried over to their Chinese plant. I am apt to believe him. Have you ever had a bad Stiletto?

Now, I can see from a business perspective why Stiletto did this. They wanted their premium Titanium hammers to be able to compete, or at least come close, to the steel framing hammers that dominate the market today. A premium steel hammer from Estwing may cost you around forty or fifty dollars. As I mentioned above the best of the best Stiletto could be over two-hundred dollars. But, these wooden handle Stiletto alternatives will allow you to get a Titanium hammer for under one-hundred dollars. (Prices subject to change.) So, yes while they are made in China it is done to keep the price down and to allow everyone to have access to the Titanium quality. You may not like it but we should understand that there are reasons for it.

One of these products are shown below.

Stiletto Tools, Inc. TI14MC Titan 14-OunceTitanium Framing Hammer With Curved Handle (Tools & Home Improvement)


Less recoil shock, Titanium head eases fatigue, magnetic nail start. Ergonomic handles. Compare to 24 oz steel hammer.
List Price: $119.99
New From: $83.40 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

Conclusion

So folks it looks like we have a mixed bag here on where Stiletto is manufacturing their products. If you want the best of the best then I can assure you that it is American made. But, if you want the Stiletto name and don’t want to shell out over two-hundred dollars then there is the wooden handle alternative from China. What I will say here and what I do like about this is that Stiletto gives you the choice. Do you want to buy American? Well, then you are going to have pay quite a bit more. Or, do you want the Stiletto name and are not worried about country of manufacture? The choice is up to you. So many companies nowadays try to mask or hide where their products are manufactured because they are ashamed. Not Stiletto. They responded right away and gave me the facts with no problems. That is commendable.

Anyways, I hope that I was able to clear things up on this matter for you the reader and the potential buyer.

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Estwing E3-22SM & E3-28SM Ounce Framing Hammer

Ease of Use
Durability
Effectiveness
Expense
Warranty
Summary
Overall I would give Estwing's E3-22SM and E3-28SM hammer a 4.2 out of 5.0. This is a great framing hammer at either twenty-two or twenty-eight ounces that will provide you with more than enough power on those heavy duty jobs. This product with it's solid one piece steel construction will last decades and you get the trusty made in America Estwing name. All of that for a realtively low cost compared to other framing hammers on the market today. The only major downside to this product is that you don't get a lot of the extra features that you could get on a slightly more expensive hammer. These could be a magnetic nail starter, side nail puller, or a replaceable face. But, these are luxury features and if you are just looking for a trusty solid steel framer than this is your baby.
4.2

Buy Now!

Hello folks! Today on ToughAssTools.com we are going to do a product review on Estwing’s E3-22SM and E3-28SM steel framing hammer. This product comes in two sizes at twenty-two or twenty-eight ounces and is THE framing hammer for a tradesmen on a budget. Is it worth buying? Or should you look elsewhere? Let’s find out!Estwing E3-28SM 28 oz Framing Hammer with Milled Face & Shock Reduction Grip

For nearly one-hundred years Estwing has held the Gold standard for one piece steel construction framing hammers. Heck, they pioneered this type of hammer all the way back in the 1920’s. Ever since then a steel framing hammer has accompanied nearly every carpenter across the United States and some would say even across the world. Most units come with a rip claw, a finished steel polish, and a thirteen to sixteen inch handle that has Estwing’s patented shock reduction grip molded onto it. (This hammer in today’s review will either be a fifteen and a half inch or a thirteen and a half if you get the short version.)

As I mentioned above this hammer comes in a twenty-two ounce and a twenty-eight ounce. These two sizes are the perfect size for a heavy duty framing hammer. Most carpenters or tradesmen prefer a twenty-two but some of the bigger guys, or the young bucks, like to use the even heavier twenty-eight ouncer. Personally, I’ll buy the twenty-two every time just to save myself some energy. Either way with these two hammers you are going to have more then enough power to drive the largest of nails on your new barn or deck.

The E3-22SM/E3-28SM comes as a solid one piece steel construction. The handle extends for sixteen inches giving you extra length, leverage, and power with each swing. To help with shock and to give you a better grip the handle comes molded and bonded with a nylon vinyl grip as shown in the picture to the right. The head on this hammer and the top of the handle will come fully polished. Like most framing hammers this product comes with a standard rip claw and it comes with a waffle or edged face to ensure better grip on nails when driving. This Estwing product does not come with a magnetic nail starter, a side nail puller, or a replaceable face.

But hey that’s enough on the features of the hammer. Let’s take a look at the Pros and Cons of the product.

Pros

  • Lots and lots of power! You get a whole lot of a power with a twenty-two ouncer and even more with a solid steel twenty-eight ouncer. As my father would say, “This hammer will put some hair on your chest.” This thing will drive 16D nails like a knife through butter. It will get the job done and give you a work out at the same time. That being said the downside of this is that it may wear you out faster than a lighter hammer… especially if you’re getting up there in age!
  • I mentioned it above but one piece solid steel construction means a lot especially if you’ve gone through the hassle of swapping out broken Hickory handles. One piece construction means durability and that means that this hammer will last generations. I am a huge fan of one piece construction rather it be steel, aluminum, or Titanium. I want my hammers to last. One user stated, “I can’t break the head off this thing no matter how bad I abuse it – I’m not sure why all hammers aren’t made from one piece…” Amen brother.
  • Like most Estwings this hammer comes with excellent balance and will make the heaviest model, the twenty-eight ouncer, feel a lot lighter than it actually is.
  • The last point that I am going to make on this product is that it is manufactured here in the good old United States of America. Estwing has been making hammers and other tools in their Rockford, Illinois office for nearly one-hundred years now and there is no sign of slowing. It’s good to buy American. Heck you can even see the Eagle and the USA letters below if you weren’t sure.

Cons

When I do my research looking for the downsides of a product I find it best to list them all out in an easily digestible list. This makes it easy for you, the consumer, to see exactly what is wrong with the product and it allows you to make the decision then and there if you want to purchase the product or if you want to move on to something else. Let’s take a look at the Cons on this Estwing product:

  • I am a huge fan of one piece construction hammers because of their durability. That being said there is a downside of going away from Hickory wooden handles and that his shock. Wood is a great shock absorber. With a solid steel hammer that shock has nowhere to go but either into the nail or into your hand and I can assure you that not all of that energy is going into the nail. Estwing and other companies have attempted to solve this problem by creating rubber, vinyl, or leather grips that are bonded or molded onto the handle. These grips goal are to soften the shock with each hit that you make. While they definitely achieve this you will still find less shock using a standard wooden handle hammer.
  • Over use and time the waffle face will eventually fade and smooth out. This isn’t a huge deal as the hammer is still usable and it will still drive nails but you do lose the traction of the waffle face. Some more expensive hammers like the Stiletto TB15MC come with a replaceable face that will allow you to swap out waffle faces as they age. Just be warned that this is a MUCH more expensive hammer.
  • This hammer doesn’t come with a lot of the bells and whistles that some of the more expensive hammers do. These could be a magnetic nail starter, a side nail puller, or even a replaceable like we talked about above. Again, I’ll reference a Stiletto for all of the extra features.
  • This is just silly but I would be amiss if I didn’t mention it as so many people are talking about it. With each strike on this hammer it makes a ‘ping’ sound. The best way I can describe it is it is like a bell going off. With each hit you get this bell or pinging sound. Some guys love it as they get that sanctification with each hit while others can’t stand it. I’ve even seen some reviewers rate the product a whole one or two stars lower just because of the pinging sound that the hammer makes.
  • The last con on this product that I would like to mention is warranty. Now I’ve always been a fan of lifetime warranties especially when it comes to a ToughAssTool. If I’m going to be spending a my money on a product I want that lifetime guarantee. While Estwing doesn’t offer a lifetime they do honor their products against any defects caused from normal use. That’s the key point, normal use. It is up to their determination on rather or not your warranty claim will be accepted.
    • Estwing’s official warranty page can be found by clicking here.
    • To file a claim you can call their customer service phone number 1-815-397-9558
    • Once your claim has been approved you can send your RA to:
      1. Estwing Mfg. Co.
        2647 8th Street
        Rockford, IL 61109
        Customer Service 815-397-9558
        sales@estwing.com

Conclusion

Overall I would give Estwing’s E3-22SM and E3-28SM hammer a 4.2 out of 5.0. This is a great framing hammer at either twenty-two or twenty-eight ounces that will provide you with more than enough power on those heavy duty jobs. This product with it’s solid one piece steel construction will last decades and you get the trusty made in America Estwing name. All of that for a relatively low cost compared to other framing hammers on the market today. The only major downside to this product is that you don’t get a lot of the extra features that you could get on a slightly more expensive hammer. These could be a magnetic nail starter, side nail puller, or a replaceable face. But, these are luxury features and if you are just looking for a trusty solid steel framer than this is your baby. If you’re interested in purchasing please click the links on the bottom of this post.

Thanks for reading! I hope that I was able to help you in your buying choice today.

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Estwing EB-15S, E15S, EB-15SR, E15SR, EB-15SM, E15SM, EB-19S, E19S, EB-19SM, and E19SM Black Ultra Framing Hammer

Ease of Use
Durability
Effectiveness
Expense
Warranty
Summary
Overall, I would say that this hammer is definitely a buy. You get the premium Estwing name, a solid one piece steel construction, a vinyl or leather grip, and a whole host of other features and addons. Along with all of the hammer comes in a variety of makes in different sizes, different grips, and different faces. There are very little cons on this product. If you're looking for a lighter weight framing hammer then this is it. I have assembled a full list of all of these options at the bottom of this review. This list should allow you to pick exactly what type of hammer you are looking for with ease.
4.3

Buy Now!

Greetings ladies and gentlemen and welcome! Today on ToughAssTools.com we are going to be doing a product review on Estwing’s EB-15S, E15S, EB-15SR, E15SR, EB-15SM, E15SM, EB-19S, E19S, EB-19SM, and E19SM black ultra framing hammer. As you can see this hammer comes with multiple buying choices such as a fifteen ounce, a fifteen ounce with a shorter handle, and a nineteen ounce. On top of that there is also a waffle or smooth faced option and a vinyl grip or a leather grip option as well. For a full listing of every option available scroll to the bottom of this product review.Estwing EB-19S 19 oz Black Ultra Framing Hammer with Smooth Face & Shock Reduction Grip

For nearly one-hundred years Estwing has held the Gold standard for one piece steel construction framing hammers. Heck, they pioneered this type of hammer all the way back in the 1920’s. Ever since then a steel framing hammer has accompanied nearly every carpenter across the United States and some would say even across the world. Most units come with a rip claw, a finished steel polish, and a thirteen to sixteen inch handle that has Estwing’s patented shock reduction grip molded onto it. (This hammer in today’s review will either be a fifteen and a half inch or a thirteen and a half if you get the short version.)

This Estwing hammer is meant for light framing work. It is marketed towards professional tradesmen but I am not sure if a nineteen ounce steel framing hammer will get the job done that they are needing. I find that most carpenters prefer a twenty to twenty-two ounce steel framer. While this comes close I fear that it may not have as much power as a twenty-two ounce Estwing.

Like most Estwings this hammer is a solid one piece steel construction and either comes with a vinyl grip which can be see on the picture to the right or it comes with a leather grip. Each grip does a great job in shock reduction. I wouldn’t say one is better than the other but some users have complained that the leather grip is sometimes hard to hold onto during a swing. It is a matter of preference though. This hammer also comes with a magnetic nail starter, a rip claw, and a side nail puller. This side nail puller is a great addition when working in tight spaces that don’t allow the larger rip claw to be used.

That’s enough about the features of the hammer though. Let’s take a look at some of the Pros and Cons and see if this product is worth your money or not.

Pros

  • The first and strongest Pro on the Estwing EB-15S, E15S, EB-15SR, E15SR, EB-15SM, E15SM, EB-19S, E19S, EB-19SM, and E19SM models are all of the features that it comes with. Most of the time if you want the magnetic nail starter, the one piece construction, the side nail puller, and a leather/vinyl grip you have to pay a pretty penny. As I write this Amazon’s price is under fifty dollars. (Subject to change at any time.) That is a heck of a deal and cannot usually be found through other brands.
  • I mentioned it above but one piece solid steel construction means a lot especially if you’ve gone through the hassle of swapping out broken Hickory handles. One piece construction means durability and that means that this hammer will last generations. I am a huge fan of one piece construction rather it be steel, aluminum, or Titanium. I want my hammers to last.
  • Like most Estwings this hammer comes with excellent balance and will make the heaviest model, the nineteen ounce, feel like you’re barely swinging anything at all.
  • If you scroll to the bottom of this post you will see just the sheer amount of options to choose from when purchasing this hammer. Vinyl or leather. Smooth or waffle. Short handle or large handle? The choices are up to you. I love the feeling of getting exactly what I want and not having to settle for something that is just good enough.
  • The last point that I am going to make on this product is that it is manufactured here in the good old United States of America. Estwing has been making hammers and other tools in their Rockford, Illinois office for nearly one-hundred years now and there is no sign of slowing. It’s good to buy American. Heck you can even see the Eagle and the USA letters below if you weren’t sure.

Estwing EB-19S 19 oz Black Ultra Framing Hammer with Smooth Face & Shock Reduction Grip

Cons

When I do my research looking for the downsides of a product I find it best to list them all out in an easily digestible list. This makes it easy for you, the consumer, to see exactly what is wrong with the product and it allows you to make the decision then and there if you want to purchase the product or if you want to move on to something else. Let’s take a look at the Cons on this Estwing product:

  • I mentioned this earlier but I am slightly concerned that this hammer only goes up to nineteen ounces in size. Most carpenters prefer at least a twenty ounce to drive the larger 16D nails with. Some prefer a twenty-two or even something bigger than that. My concern here is that if this nineteen ounce is big enough to get the job done. If you’re a do-it-yourselfer or a weekend warrior then this hammer is perfect for you. However, if you are a full time carpenter looking for a new hammer I would either recommend the twenty-two ounce Estwing or a Stiletto Titanium hammer if you are wanting to spend a bit more.
  • I am a huge fan of one piece construction hammers because of their durability. That being said there is a downside of going away from Hickory wooden handles and that his shock. Wood is a great shock absorber. With a solid steel hammer that shock has nowhere to go but either into the nail or into your hand and I can assure you that not all of that energy is going into the nail. Estwing and other companies have attempted to solve this problem by creating rubber, vinyl, or leather grips that are bonded or molded onto the handle. These grips goal are to soften the shock with each hit that you make. While they definitely achieve this you will still find less shock using a standard wooden handle hammer.
  • During my research on this product I did see a few quality issues but nothing too alarming. I believe these were one off instances that had slipped past Estwing’s quality control department. Some of these include premature rusting, rough edges that were not smoothed out during the milling process, off balance hammers with all of the weight in the handle, and misshapen hammer faces. Again, I wouldn’t worry too much about this as they are one off occurrences.
  • This is just silly but I would be amiss if I didn’t mention it as so many people are talking about it. With each strike on this hammer it makes a ‘ping’ sound. The best way I can describe it is it is like a bell going off. With each hit you get this bell or pinging sound. Some guys love it as they get that sanctification with each hit while others can’t stand it. I’ve even seen some reviewers rate the product a whole one or two stars lower just because of the pinging sound that the hammer makes.
  • The last con on this product that I would like to mention is warranty. Now I’ve always been a fan of lifetime warranties especially when it comes to a ToughAssTool. If I’m going to be spending a my money on a product I want that lifetime guarantee. While Estwing doesn’t offer a lifetime they do honor their products against any defects caused from normal use. That’s the key point, normal use. It is up to their determination on rather or not your warranty claim will be accepted.
    • Estwing’s official warranty page can be found by clicking here.
    • To file a claim you can call their customer service phone number 1-815-397-9558
    • Once your claim has been approved you can send your RA to:
      1. Estwing Mfg. Co.
        2647 8th Street
        Rockford, IL 61109
        Customer Service 815-397-9558
        sales@estwing.com

Conclusion

Overall, I would say that this hammer is definitely a buy. You get the premium Estwing name, a solid one piece steel construction, a vinyl or leather grip, and a whole host of other features and addons. Along with all of the hammer comes in a variety of makes in different sizes, different grips, and different faces. There are very little cons on this product.

If you’re looking for a lighter weight framing hammer then this is it. I have assembled a full list of all of these options at the bottom of this review. This list shows each model number along with their features and should allow you to pick exactly what type of hammer you are looking for with ease.

Thanks for reading! I hope that I was able to help you in your buying choice today.

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Vaughan VW20 Douglas Pattern 20 oz. Framing Hammer

Ease of Use
Durability
Effectiveness
Expense
Warranty
Summary
Overall, I am going to give Vaughan's VW20 framing hammer a 3.1 out of 5.0. While this may not sound like an extremely low review I can assure you that this is the lowest score that I've given a product so far on this site. When I review products on ToughAssTools.com I only want to review the best and frankly I feel that this hammer falls short. The pricing levels on this product worry me but if it was only the pricing then I could let some of it slide. Where a lot of the points came off was on durability. Those instances of bad casting worry me. I do not want to recommend a product only to have the claw fail on you after only a few weeks of use. At this point I am going to say it's a no buy. 
3.1

Buy Now!

Hello ladies and gentlemen! Today on ToughAssTools.com we are going to be doing a product review on Vaughan’s VW20 Douglas Pattern twenty ounce framing hammer. There wasn’t a lot of information on this hammer that could be found through my research but I will do my best to provide you with the most accurate assessment that I can on Vaughan’s product.Vaughan VW20 Douglas Pattern 20 oz. Framing Hammer, milled face, side puller, mag nail set, 17" straight handle

Vaughan manufacturing has been around since just after the American Civil War ended. Yes, they’ve been around that long. As of 1869 the Vaughan and Bushnell company has been making custom and quality tools. With nearly one-hundred and fifty years of experience I would say that they know what they are doing. For more information on their company click here.

The VW20 Douglas Framing Hammer comes in at twenty ounces. In my opinion this twenty ounce weight is the ‘sweet spot’ when it comes to framing hammers. You get just enough power to drive those larger nails but your hammer is not so heavy that it is difficult to use. The handle on this hammer extends to sixteen inches and is a straight Hickory make. To strengthen the handle there are two bolts to ensure that the head and handle do not separate. This is a unique feature that is not found on most Hickory handled hammers.

The bolts I mentioned above connect the head to the hammer using Vaughan’s patented ‘Deep V’ head design. This design not only allows for a more secure connection but it also provides greater power at the point of impact and less stress on your arm. The face of the head comes with a milled or waffle face as shown in the picture to the right. At the top of the head there is a magnetic nail starter which I’m sure most of you are used to. This combined with the waffle face makes it much easier to drive larger nails.

The claw on this hammer is a rip, or straight claw, as it is with most framing hammers. Although this rip claw is shorter than most giving you the ability to get into tighter places and to gain more leverage. This shorter claw is also reinforced to provide extra strength when prying two by fours or whatever else you are tearing apart. The last feature on this hammer is the sidewinder side nail puller that can be seen in the picture to the right. This feature allows you to easily pull out those hard to reach nails and will also give you another option for demolition or for extracting a nail.

Pros

As I said at the beginning of this article there really wasn’t a lot of information to be found on this product. Most of the Pros on this hammer are the many features it comes with such as the side puller, the magnetic starter, the reinforced bolted head to handle, and the reinforced rip claw. All of these features add up to a great hammer and also add up in price. There are a few more things I’d like to mention before moving onto the cons section.

The finished hammer comes with a powder coat finish. This may not mean much to you, heck… doesn’t mean much to me, but I figured I would mention it as I know there are some guys out there who just love the powder coating. (Don’t get me started on powder coated wheels.) This hammer also comes with over strike protection to ensure your hammer is secure.Vaughan VW20 Douglas Pattern 20 oz. Framing Hammer, milled face, side puller, mag nail set, 17" straight handle

The last thing I’m going to mention on this hammer is a big one. This product is made in the United States of America. Vaughan seems to be one of the few companies nowadays who still believe in American craftsmanship. If you are looking for an American made hammer than this may be the one for you.

Cons

When I go over the Cons on a product that I am reviewing I like to lay them out in the most easy to read and organized fashion I can. I want to make it an easy decision for you, the consumer. Do you want to buy the product or do you want to move on to something else? Let’s take a look at some of the Cons on the Vaughan VW20:

  • Hickory Handle – As most of you know by now I am not a fan of Hickory handles. Hickory handles are prone to breaking. It doesn’t matter how strong the wood it is. It will eventually break on you. If I buy a hammer, especially an expensive one, I do not want to be bothered having to unwedge the broken handle, order a new one, and then have to wedge in a new one. I’m sorry but I don’t have the time nor the want to do that. I want something durable like steel. This is just my preference though, if you’re fine with replacing handles every once and a while then by all means go ahead and purchase.
  • Poor Casting – Alright, so this one could seriously be a problem. I wasn’t able to find too much information on this hammer but the stuff that I did find wasn’t the best. There are at least four recorded instances of the claw on the hammer snapping off after only a few days or weeks of use. Obviously, this is a big problem and will cause your hammer to be useless. I had to take off quite a bit of points due to these complaints. There is always the possibility to file a warranty but I am not sure if you will get a new product or your money back from Vaughan. (I go into more on the warranty side below.)
  • Price – I know this is an American made product but I have to take points off on price. As I write this this product is going for nearly eight dollars on various E-Commerce websites. This price seems extremely high considering that I can get a Hickory handled Titanium hammer for right about the same price. If you’re going to spend this amount of money why not get yourself a Ti Stiletto?
  • Warranty – Vaughan’s warranty is vague. I understand that they have to analyze each and every case when a hammer comes back for abuse but usually there is a more detailed warranty policy written such as one year policy, or lifetime warranty. I struggled to find an official warranty term but instead found this, “Replacement will be solely at the discretion of Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg Co. Nothing in this policy shall be interpreted or construed as an express or implied warranty, all of which are excluded by Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg Co.” From this I can see that there is a high chance that a warranty claim may be denied. For more information click here to be taken directly to their warranty page.

Conclusion

Overall, I am going to give Vaughan’s VW20 framing hammer a 3.1 out of 5.0. While this may not sound like an extremely low review I can assure you that this is the lowest score that I’ve given a product so far on this site. When I review products on ToughAssTools.com I only want to review the best and frankly I feel that this hammer falls short. The pricing levels on this product worry me but if it was only the pricing then I could let some of it slide. Where a lot of the points came off was on durability. Those instances of bad casting worry me. I do not want to recommend a product only to have the claw fail on you after only a few weeks of use. At this point I am going to say it’s a no buy.

After saying that, if you are interested in purchasing then by all means visit our Amazon partner by clicking here. However, if you’re looking for an equivalent product for a bit cheaper price then I would recommend getting yourself an Estwing steel framer. You’ll get a great and durable hammer for half the cost.

Thanks for reading and I hope that I was able to help you in your buying decision.

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Estwing E20C 20 oz Curved Claw Hammer with Smooth Face & Leather Grip

Ease of Use
Durability
Effectiveness
Expense
Warranty
Summary
Overall, I would say this hammer is definitely a buy. It is well worth your money and comes with very few downsides to it. You get a solid one piece steel construction framing hammer from a reputable company. The leather grip and cover on this is the only thing up for debate. Some users love the feel and look of it while others say that the cover is too fat and is even slippery to the grip during swinging. But, as I said before it is all a matter of preference. Do you prefer the leather or the poly-rubber grip? Either way you'll be getting a quality product.
4.2

Buy Now!

Hello ladies and gentlemen! Today on ToughAssTools we are going to be reviewing Estwing’s E20C and E16C hammer with a leather grip. This is a unique type of framing hammer that you really can’t find elsewhere besides from Estwing. This product comes with a bonded leather grip that you can see in the picture on the right. A lot guys buy this hammer because it looks nice and they like it hanging in their garage but the leather does also provide a unique grip on the handle that users either love or hate.Estwing E20S 20 oz Straight Claw Hammer with Smooth Face & Leather Grip

For nearly one-hundred years Estwing has held the Gold standard for one piece steel construction framing hammers. Heck, they even pioneered this type of hammer all the way back in the 1920’s. Ever since then a steel framing hammer has accompanied nearly every carpenter across the United States and some would say even across the world. Oh, and the best part about Estwing? All of their products are still made here in the United States up north in Rockford, Illinois. You can visit their website by clicking here.

As I mentioned above the Estwing EC20 & E16C comes in either a sixteen or twenty ounce size. This hammer also comes with a straight or rip claw extension as well. What you choose is honestly up to you. If you’re looking for a good framing hammer then I would recommend going for the twenty ouncer with the rip claw. I always prefer the rip anyways and the extra four ounces gives you that extra umph of power with each drive.

This hammer comes with a twelve and a half inch handle along with the leather grip as I spoke about above. I won’t get too much into the leather grip here, look to the Pros and Cons on that. Along with the handle you get a smooth face over a waffle and a fully polished head and neck on the hammer. Adding the polished metal with the handle gives the hammer a very aesthetically pleasing look.

That’s enough about what the hammer looks like let’s take a dive into what the Pros and Cons are on this product. Is it worth your money or should you move on? Let’s find out.

Pros

The big selling point on this hammer as well as Estwing’s other hammers are the one piece steel construction. I am a huge fan of one piece construction hammers mainly because with the wooden handles you have to worry about the handle breaking or snapping in half on you. I hate going through the hassle of having to pull out what is left of the handle, order a new one, and then wedge the new one back into the head. You never have to worry about that again with a solid steel hammer. The durability on this hammer will last generations.

Along with Estwing’s famous one piece steel construction comes their just as famous balance and temper on their hammers. Most people won’t notice this but if you’ve ever swung an unbalanced hammer or one with all of the weight in the face of the hammer you will know the awkwardness and discomfort that comes with every swing. There is no need to worry about that with an Estwing product.

The bonded leather grip can be seen as both a Pro and a Con. A lot of guys like the feel of the leather and the the durability of it. The leather also adds an extra thickness to the handle that isn’t seen with Estwing’s Poly-Rubber cover. The leather cover has just about the same shock absorption as the rubber and you get the leather look to your hammer. Trust me, this type of hammer will stand out amongst your piers and may even start a couple of conversations.

The last Pro I’ll mention on Estwing’s EC20 and EC16 is that they are made in the United States. Sadly, that is such a rare find nowadays as it seems like nearly everything is manufactured overseas and shipped over here in a container for mass distribution. I don’t know about you but I like the idea of buying something that was manufactured only a few states away rather than an entire ocean away. Helping your fellow countrymen and all that jam.

Cons

Whenever I review a product I like to lay out all of the Cons and let you decide. That being said there aren’t really that many Cons on this product. I did my usual research and I found some but none of them I would consider deal breakers. Let’s take a look:

  • Remember before I was talking about the benefits of a one piece construction hammer? Well, there are benefits but there are also drawbacks. The biggest drawback on a solid steel hammer is the shock or vibrations when striking. The steel reverberates the shock right into your wrist, elbow, and shoulder. A wooden handle would absorb the shock but has tendency to break. In an effort to dampen the shock on their hammers Estwing opted for either their poly-rubber cover or the leather cover that is on this hammers. These covers dampen the shock significantly, but there is still more shock than a wooden handle.
  • This is just silly but I would be amiss if I didn’t mention it as so many people are talking about it. With each strike on this hammer it makes a ‘ping’ sound. The best way I can describe it is it is like a bell going off. With each hit you get this bell or pinging sound. Some guys love it as they get that sanctification with each hit while others can’t stand it. I’ve even seen some reviewers rate the product a whole one or two stars lower just because of the pinging sound that the hammer makes.
  • The leather grip on this handle is nice to look at but many users have complained that the leather makes the handle too fat or too large to handle. Some users have even said it is hard to get a decent grip and that the leather is slippery during swings. In all honesty it is just a matter of preference. I won’t detract too much from this on my score but I wanted to bring it to your attention.Estwing E16S 16 oz Straight Claw Hammer with Smooth Face & Leather Grip
  • The last con that I’m going to bring up on this hammer is inconsistent quality. Regardless of your quality control process some duds will sneak through. In my experience companies may check one of every hundred units or one of ever fifty units. They rarely check them all. I can only speculate what Estwing’s policy is. Here are some of the defects that we’ve seen:
    • The handle on the hammer is crooked.
    • Leather is loose or washers to secure leather are installed incorrectly.
    • Some of the finishes have sharp edges or nicks in the leather finish.
    • If you do receive a defective product then I would recommend contacting Estwing to file a warranty claim by clicking here to go to their official website.
    • If you find that you aren’t a fan of the leather then I would recommend checking out the Estwing with the basic poly/rubber grip. I wrote a review on this hammer the other day and it can be found by clicking here.

Conclusion

Overall, I would say this hammer is definitely a buy. It is well worth your money and comes with very few downsides to it. You get a solid one piece steel construction framing hammer from a reputable company. The leather grip and cover on this is the only thing up for debate. Some users love the feel and look of it while others say that the cover is too fat and is even slippery to the grip during swinging. But, as I said before it is all a matter of preference. Do you prefer the leather or the poly-rubber grip? Either way you’ll be getting a quality product.

If you are interested in purchasing this product then I would recommend visiting our Amazon partner by clicking on the links below. Remember, ToughAssTools recommends the twenty ounce rip claw version. More power and more demo!

I hope that I was able to help in your buying choice today. Thank you for reading!

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Hello ladies and gentlemen! Today on ToughAssTools.com we are going to be taking a look at what size of hammer you will actually need. There are so many sizes and choices to choose from right now that it can be confusing to a lot of people. The basic rule of thumb that I want to mention and get out of the way right away is that find the hammer that is heavy enough to get the job done but not too heavy to hurt yourself with. I don’t care if you six foot six and three-hundred pounds. If a twenty ounce framer is enough to get the job done then use it. It is not worth risking injury.

When I was a stupid teenager nearly thirteen years ago I was really into power lifting and bodybuilding. I felt like I was invincible and that I had do everything I could to get bigger and to lift more weight. Nothing could stop me. It was always a heavier lift. Well, nothing did stop me back then… but if we fast forward to today I have so many back issues at the age of thirty-one that I have trouble mowing the lawn sometimes. I know this is getting off topic but the point that I am trying to make here is that to take care of your body now or else you will regret it later.

If you go in swinging a ridiculous thirty-two ounce steel framer you might not feel it today but I can assure you that after a few years you will be regretting it. The point I’m trying to make here is swing what you are comfortable with. No one is going to care if you’re swinging a sixteen ounce hammer during a job… and if they do then screw them. It’s not about what they think it is about what works best for you and what protects you from injury. But I am off my soapbox for now. Just take it as an nearly old man ranting for a few minutes.

The Sizes

Let’s get back to what size of hammer is right for you. As I said before there are so many choices out there they can be a bit overwhelming. For an example if we look at this Estwing E3 model on Amazon.com we see that there are seven different sizes listed on the one Amazon page. The question is which one do you need and what should you take into consideration?

  • 08 Ounces – The eight ounce and even the ten ounce aren’t going do you much good on a framing project. These size of hammers are mainly used for metal working and are usually found as a ball and pein type of hammer. The other use for these could be finishing hammers when working on trim work or any other kind of intricate matters.
  • 10 Ounces – The ten ounce hammer is almost an in the middle between a standard curved claw hammer and a ball and pein hammer. There are some metal workers who prefer the ten while some homeowners who prefer the lightweight of a ten ounce hammer for around the house uses. Again, a ten ounce hammer could also be used for finishing or trim work.
  • 12 Ounces – Twelve and fourteen ounce hammers are your typical homeowner’s hammer. It usually comes with a curved claw and can be found at your average hardware store on Amazon.com. This gives you enough power without being overwhelming to a novice.
  • 14 Ounces – The fourteen ounces is your typical homeowner’s hammer. It usually comes with a curved claw and can be found at your average hardware store on Amazon.com. This gives you enough power without being overwhelming to a novice.
  • 16 Ounces – The sixteen is an improvement, obviously, but you will still be lacking in power on a framing job. It may end up taking more swings then you should be doing just to drive one large nail. I would recommend moving up to at least a twenty ouncer, but if you absolutely have to have the sixteen it will work.
  • 20 Ounces – The twenty ouncer along with the twenty-two ouncers are the standard size that most carpenters pick. There is enough weight to drive the larger 16D nails with ease but it’s also not too heavy to tire you out or to lead to injury.
  • 22 Ounces – The twenty ouncer along with the twenty-two ouncers are the standard size that most carpenters pick. There is enough weight to drive the larger 16D nails with ease but it’s also not too heavy to tire you out or to lead to injury.
  • 25 Ounces – For those of you with larger bodies you may end up preferring the twenty-five ouncer. You get that extra power and the hammer may feel more comfortable in your hands.
  • 28 Ounces – Sure there are instances where you may  need a twenty-eight ounce framing hammer but I can assure you that they are rare. A twenty-two or a twenty-five will be able to get the same job done as a twenty-eight. It just may take more time. The question you have to ask yourself is it worth it.
  • 30 Ounces – Ok so this just goes above and beyond. Unless you’re a giant I just don’t see a point in getting a hammer this heavy. The hammers listed above will do your job just fine and you won’t have the risk of seriously hurting yourself with each swing you do. On top of that a hammer this heavy is just inefficient. You are going to tire yourself out after only a few hours of work.
  • 32 Ounces – The thirty and the thirty-two ounce hammers are the biggest of the biggest. Well, that is until you get into sledge hammers. These hammers should not be used for framing but instead for more industrial uses such as demolition or driving nails into concrete. These hammers pack a punch and also take an exurbanite amount of effort to swing. The risk of injury is also high due to the size and the shock with each hit. The hammer I linked, the Vaughan, comes with a wooden handle so at least a good portion of the shock will be absorbed by the wood.

Conclusion

So, in conclusion size matters! If you are looking for the perfect framing hammer size I would recommend the twenty or the twenty-two ouncer. If you’re looking for a basic hammer or something a little on the lighter side then I would recommend a twelve or sixteen ouncer. If you’re looking for a finishing hammer then anything less then twelve ounces should get the job done.

An additional point that I’d like to make is that there are Titanium hammers out there. Titanium hammers are forty-five percent less in weight than your typical iron or steel hammers. What that means if that you get the same driving power in a much lighter package. These hammers have begun to increase in popularity. I wrote a ‘Best Titanium Hammers,’ article the other day that can be found by clicking here.

Now I know I didn’t cover every single hammer size there is on the market today but this will definitely give you a good idea of what size is right for you. The last thing I’ll mention on this article is that there are many kinds of hammers out there and this article’s goal was to focus on your basic and framing hammers. So, if you don’t see any sledge hammers listed that is why.

Thanks for reading and I hope that I was able to help you in your purchase.

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Estwing E3-22S 22 oz Framing Hammer with Smooth Face & Shock Reduction Grip

Ease of Use
Durability
Effectiveness
Expense
Warranty
Summary
Overall, I would say that the Estwing is a definite buy for a novice, an experienced do-it-yourselfer, or a seasoned tradesmen. This is a reliable hammer that will get the job done year after year. The best part about this hammer is the one piece construction. No more snapped wooden handles. No more having to buy new ones and swapping them out. Your steel handle and head will stay with you for a very long time.
4.2

Buy Now!

Hello ladies and gentlemen! Today on ToughAssTools we are going to be doing an in-depth product review on Estwing’s E3 framing hammer. This hammer is made by Estwing and is one of the most common Steel framing hammers in the market today. It comes in all different sizes and we will break those down to determine exactly what you need.Estwing E3-22S 22 oz Framing Hammer with Smooth Face

For nearly one-hundred years Estwing has held the Gold standard for one piece steel construction framing hammers. Heck, they pioneered this type of hammer all the way back in the 1920’s. Ever since then a steel framing hammer has accompanied nearly every carpenter across the United States and some would say even across the world.

Most units come with a rip claw, a finished steel polish, and a thirteen inch handle that has Estwing’s patented shock reduction grip molded onto it. Shock is a big problem when it comes to steel hammers and this grip is an effort to reduce or eliminate any unwanted shock.

First thing’s first though before we get into the Pros and Cons of this hammer let’s take a look at exactly what size of hammer you will need.

 

What Size Do I Need?

This can be confusing to a lot of people, especially novices when it comes to picking out a framing hammer. There are so many options available that it can be a little overwhelming. If we look at this Estwing E3 model on Amazon.com we see that there are seven different sizes listed on the one Amazon page. The question is which one do you need and what should you take into consideration?

  • 12 Ounces – Honestly, I don’t know when a twelve ounce framing hammer would get the job done. Frankly, there just isn’t enough power in it to drive the big boy nails that you would need to be using.
  • 16 Ounces – The sixteen is an improvement, obviously, but you will still be lacking in power. It may end up taking more swings then you should be doing just to drive one nail. I would recommend moving up to at least a twenty ouncer, but if you absolutely have to have the sixteen it will work.
  • 20 Ounces – The twenty ouncer along with the twenty-two ouncers are the standard size that most carpenters pick. There is enough weight to drive the larger 16D nails with ease but it’s also not too heavy to tire you out or to lead to injury.
  • 22 Ounces – The twenty ouncer along with the twenty-two ouncers are the standard size that most carpenters pick. There is enough weight to drive the larger 16D nails with ease but it’s also not too heavy to tire you out or to lead to injury.
  • 25 Ounces – For those of you with larger bodies you may end up preferring the twenty-five ouncer. You get that extra power and the hammer may feel more comfortable in your hands.
  • 28 Ounces – Sure there are instances where you may  need a twenty-eight ounce framing hammer but I can assure you that they are rare. A twenty-two or a twenty-five will be able to get the same job done as a twenty-eight. It just may take more time. The question you have to ask yourself is it worth it.
  • 30 Ounces – Ok so this just goes above and beyond. Unless you’re a giant I just don’t see a point in getting a hammer this heavy. The hammers listed above will do your job just fine and you won’t have the risk of seriously hurting yourself with each swing you do. On top of that a hammer this heavy is just inefficient. You are going to tire yourself out after only a few hours of work.

So, in conclusion if you are looking for the perfect framing hammer size I would recommend the twenty or the twenty-two ouncer. But hey that is enough about the sizes of the hammer let’s actually take a look at what the Pros and Cons are on this product. Is it worth your money, or should you go elsewhere?

Pros

Alright now that we got that out of the way let’s take a look at some of the Pros on these Estwing framing hammers. I’m an organized kind of guy and so instead of writing a long babbling paragraph I’m going to divide this up into bullet points:

  • Estwing’s one piece steel hammers are known for nearly the past century for their durability. These babies will not break on you. No more having to swap out wooden handles and go through that whole process. If you are one of the unlucky fellows and get a bad unit you can always file a warranty claim with Estwing by clicking this link. They are very supportive and helpful to any defects on their products.
  • As a result of the one piece solid steel construction the balance on this hammer is superb. The claw, head, and handle are all balanced so well that it makes the hammer feel even lighter than it is.
  • Another benefit to these hammers is overall ease of use. You get a lot of power on these steel hammers and couple that with the balance mentioned above it makes for one great hammer. After some use you will find that you’re driving 16D nails after only a two to three strikes.
  • The price on these things are great. You can get this hammer that will last for generations most of the time for under fifty dollars. That is an ever lasting hammer that you won’t have to buy again. I’d say it is worth a small investment to get that.American Made Estwings
  • The last pro I’ll mention on these hammers is that they are USA made. I hate that I even have to point this out but it seems like every year something else is manufactured over in China. Not these babies. They are all made over in Rockford, Illinois.

Cons

As I did before I’ll list the cons on the Estwing E3 framing hammers below:

  • The big problem with Steel hammers are shock and reverberations after each hit. With a standard wooden handle hammer most of the shock of impact is absorbed by the wood. With Steel this is not true, as most of you already know. Anyone who’s used a Steel framer for twelve hours on end will know that familiar feeling in their wrists and elbows. Over time injuries can occur from Steel framing hammers. These could include Carpel Tunnel, Tennis Elbow, or shoulder problems. In Estwing’s defense on this issue they went out of their way to develop a shock reduction nylon cover that is molded onto the steel which can be seen in the above picture.
  • Some of these Estwings that have shipped out have come out unfinished, brittle, or with rough/sharp edges from the milling process. I’ll say right now that these are exceptions and that most of the time you will get a high quality product. There’s always a bad batch every now and then. If you are one of the unlucky fellows and get a bad unit you can always file a warranty claim with Estwing by clicking this link.Lacquer Coming off on Estwing Framing Hammer
  • This isn’t really a con but it is worth mentioning as I see a lot of bad reviews written because of this. The hammer will come to you fully polished in a protective lacquer. Please note that over use this lacquer will chip and come off but there is nothing to worry about. There is no harm done to your hammer and the actual steel is being revealed under the lacquer. There is nothing to worry about. For an example please refer to the picture to the right.

Conclusion

Overall, I would say that the Estwing is a definite buy for a novice, an experienced do-it-yourselfer, or a seasoned tradesmen. This is a reliable hammer that will get the job done year after year. The best part about this hammer is the one piece construction. No more snapped wooden handles. No more having to buy new ones and swapping them out. Your steel handle and head will stay with you for a very long time. If you are interested in purchasing this product then I would recommend clicking here and being taken to Amazon.com

Before I close this article I feel like I would be amiss if I didn’t mention the competing Titanium hammers. Ti hammers first started showing up around 1999 by the Stiletto Tool company and over the years have begun to pick up in popularity. I won’t get into too much of it here but I would say that if I had the choice between a Steel or a Titanium I would choose the Ti every time. For more information on this please click this link to go to my latest article ‘What Are The Best Titanium Hammers?’

Thanks for reading everyone. I hope that I was able to help you in your buying decision.

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools

Hello ladies and gentlemen! Hope everyone had a great fourth. Titanium versus Steel hammers is a debate that has been going on for nearly two decades now. Ever since the first Titanium hammer was introduced into the market all the way back in 1998 by the Stiletto Tool company a debate has been raging between both sides as to what hammer is better.

There are hardcore Steel guys who scoff at the idea of a fancy Titanium hammer. They want their tried and tested Estwing Steel and nothing else. But there are others out there who have tried the new Ti hammers, such as the Stiletto TB15MC, and have fallen in love with their quality and their benefits.  The question I have for you today is which is better? Who wins, Steel or Titanium? Well folks, let’s find out.

Steel

The one piece construction Steel hammer that we know and love today can be traced all the way back to Ernest Estwing and his Estwing hammer company in the year 1926. Steel hammers are the usual go to for any tradesmen, carpenter, or even any laymen who wants to put together a new garage. They are so widely used today and available for such a low price it is no wonder that there is resistance to the Titanium hammers entering the market as a new competitor.Estwing E3-22S 22 oz Framing Hammer with Smooth Face

The first and easiest points for Steel hammers are the price. You can get a standard Estwing Steel framing hammer for between twenty-fifty dollars depending on the size and type of hammer you purchase. (Prices are subject to change.) This price is a step above from the standard wooden handled framing hammers on the market today that can sometimes be as cheap as fifteen dollars. These Steel hammers are also significantly cheaper than a typical Titanium. Ti hammers can range between eighty dollars all the way up to and past two-hundred dollars.

Now one of the downsides of Steel hammers which I’m sure most of you know are the shock and reverberations you feel after repeated usage. Each time you drive a nail there is a shock from the impact that echoes and reverberates its way back into your wrist, to your elbow, and sometimes even to your shoulder. After years of continual use framers can develop Carpel Tunnel, Tennis Elbow, or a variety of other injuries. There have been attempts by Estwing and other Steel hammer manufacturers to reduce the shock by using rubber or poly handles. While these handles help they do not eliminate the problem.

To complicate the problem more with Steel hammers is that to get a decent drive on a 16D nail you need a moderately heavy hammer. Most guys go with a twenty or twenty-two ouncer but some of the big guys feel that they have to get a twenty-six, twenty-eight, or even a thirty ouncer. This extra weight swing after swing only adds to the potential of injury. The only upside to this extra weight that I can see is that it aids in demolition when using the rip claw. After all the more weight you have the more power you have to destroy!

 

Titanium

There are two big selling points on Titanium hammers. The first is that Titanium is forty-five percent less in weight than Steel. Don’t be alarmed though. This reduction in weight will not hinder your driving power at all, in fact it may even help you. Titanium has the same power as Steel but comes in the lighter weight package allowing you to retire your twenty-eight ouncer for a sixteen ounce Ti hammer.Stiletto TB15MC TiBone 15-Ounce Titanium Milled-Face Hammer

The thing to keep in mind is that Titanium allows users to transfer ninety-seven percent of your swing energy onto the nail while a steel hammer only allows for seventy percent of that energy. What does that mean? Well that thirty percent energy leftover on the steel hammer has to go somewhere and I bet you can guess where it ends up. Right in your wrist, elbow, and shoulder. The Titanium only has three percent of displaced energy not going onto the nail. You get a more efficient hammer at nearly half the weight of your typical steel framer. This is how you can get a sixteen ounce Ti hammer hitting like a twenty-eight ouncer. What’s that old saying we’ve all heard from our fathers? Work smarter, not harder.

The second point I want to make on Titanium hammers is that along with the reduced weight Titanium also has ten times less the recoil or shock than Steel. So, not only are you getting the weight savings with each swing you are also getting less reverberations and shock with each swing. For you younger bucks out there that might not mean much but come back in another fifteen years of swinging and you’ll be signing a different tune. The goal of these Ti hammers is to reduce injury and to make you more efficient. I mean, who wouldn’t want that? I was reading an article the other day where the writer mentioned that he had some of his skeptical carpenters do a ‘concrete test,’ with both a Steel and a Titanium hammer. They would swing each hammer into the concrete floor and see which felt better on their arms. The Ti won without question and just by doing a few swings it won over some of the skeptics.

Conclusion

If you ask me and my opinion then I say Titanium wins hands down. You may no want to hear it but Steel hammers are antiquated and will eventually be a thing of the past either being replaced by Titanium or Aluminum alternatives. There are so many options today on Titanium hammers ranging from a light weight ten ouncer with a hickory handle all the way up to a fifteen ounce solid Titanium one piece construction hammer. And as I write this today there are even more Titanium, and other types of hammers, being invented, innovated, and improved on today. The days of the Estwing Steel hammers may very well be numbered.

If you are on the fence about purchasing a Titanium hammer then I would suggest you look at the following questions and answer them to yourself. Does it make sense for you or should you stick with your steel?

  • Are you looking for a hammer to have around the house and use occasionally on projects?
    • If so, then I would recommend a Steel Estwing. It wouldn’t make sense to invest the kind of money it takes to buy a Titanium hammer if you will just be using it off and on.
  • Are you a weekend warrior working on a new project every other week spending hours on end framing?
    • This situation can be up for debate. If you’re not swinging every day in and out then you may not need a Titanium but if you want a nice quality product that isn’t going to break on you then you could make the jump up to Stiletto’s Titanium.
  • Are you a tradesmen or full time carpenter looking to replace your Steel?
    • Instead of going back to Steel I would recommend you hop on the Titanium train now and purchase at least a basic model Titanium to give it a try. I wrote an article the other day going into what the best Titanium hammers on the market today are. You can read it by clicking here.
  • Are you in your forties, fifties, or even sixties? Do you have former injuries to your wrist or elbow?
    • The great thing about Titanium hammers is that they are so easy on the body. You will notice a huge difference and your body will thank you for it. It is a smart move to purchase. They even offer some products as light as ten ounces with the driving power of a sixteen ounce steel.

I hope that I was able to answer your questions today and I was able to help in your buying decision.

Thanks for reading,

Alec Johnson

ToughAssTools